Viewing entries tagged
Holly

Plant of the Day - Ilex rugosa

This holly grows as a ground cover under tall conifers. I collected  this unusual holly in the Japanese Alps in Nagano near where the Winter Olympics were held.  It forms a low mass of stems to about 2’ tall clothed with glossy evergreen foliage with a distinct network of impressed veins on the leaves giving a very rough (or rugose) texture.  Glossy red fruit decorate the prostrate branches on female plants.  Since it was growing at such high altitude under spruce, I am not certain how much heat it will tolerate in the landscape and may prove to be a better performer in more northern gardens.  So far it has grown well for us in the greenhouse and in our Lath House.  Propagate by seed or cuttings.  Hardy to zone 5, not heat tolerant.  Sun to shade.

Follow me at @jcramark because life is too short for boring plants.

The glossy, leathery foliage with deeply impressed veins provide an unusual texture.

Check out all the happenings at http://www.ncsu.edu/jcraulstonarboretum

Plant of the Day - Ilex 'Whoa Nellie'

Bright foliage screams in the sun. This introduction was named by Tony Avent after seeing it in Mike Dirr's research plot at the University of GA.  I always imagine trying to wedge a word in edgewise in what must be a rapid-fire, slightly (yeah, right) opinionated barrage of plant knowledge between these 2 plantsmen.  At any rate, this screaming yellow-foliaged form of the popular 'Nellie R. Stevens' holly will definitely give a little kick to your garden.  In shade, the foliage will quickly lose the gold coloration so plant this out where it will receive maximum exposure.  In sun, the foliage will remain bright for about a year then turn green.  We've found it fairly vigorous in good soil.  Orange-red fruits add to the color riot if male pollinators are nearby.  Ilex 'Whoa Nellie' will ultimately reach about 30' tall but will probably be showiest if sheared occasionally to stimulate plenty of new, gold growth.

Follow me at @jcramark because life is too short for boring plants.

Expect plants to make a pyramidal accent in the garden.

Check out all the happenings at http://www.ncsu.edu/jcraulstonarboretum